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Student Well-Being


Well-being matters because students with higher well-being are healthier mentally and physically, perform better academically, and have stronger relationships. UT is committed to enhancing the well-being of our undergraduates through the Volunteer Experience. We firmly believe that creating a university culture that centers on and promotes well-being will bolster the overall success of our student scholars not only during their time at UT, but provide them skills to thrive throughout their lives.

There are many frameworks available that promote well-being. We have chosen to ground our efforts in the PERMA Model of Well-being, which includes five key elements: positive emotions, engagement, relationships, meaning, and accomplishments (Seligman, 2011).

PERMA - positive emotion, engagement, relationships, meaning, and accomplishments

Creating environments and interactions that elicit the full range of positive human responses, from joy and compassion, to interest and gratitude, opens individuals to think creatively and respond to challenges in healthy ways.

Helping scholars develop their strengths – those things that they are innately good at and enjoy doing –met with a healthy level of challenge.

Developing authentic, energizing, and supportive relationships.

Helping scholars find a sense of being connected to something bigger than themselves and purpose in what they do.

Recognizing all individuals’ basic need to feel they are growing and making progress in life and finding opportunities to help students celebrate their mastery of content and successes pursuant to their goals.

Learn more about the PERMA Model of Wellbeing via the Positive Psychology Center.

Well-being Resources

  • What Is Deficit Thinking? An Analysis of Conceptualizations of Deficit Thinking and Implications for Scholarly Research
  • Impact of Positive Psychology in Higher Education
  • Towards a Positive University
  • The New Landscape for Well-Being: How Prioritizing Safety, Health, and Inclusion Improves Student Success

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